First Buildings

We’ve been working with a number of talented 3D artists over the last month or so.  We asked each one to model a building for us — something with a modern-to-futuristic style.  Since it’s always a nice day on the High Frontier, but land is expensive, we asked them to put the roof to good use.  Here are some of the models we’ve gotten so far.

Office tower by Nicolas Bulchak
Office tower by Nicolas Bulchak

Apartment building by Aaron Hillaker
Apartment building by Aaron Hillaker
Office tower by Martin Rowley
Office tower by Martin Rowley
Café and department store by Liam Stones
Café and department store by Liam Stones
Shop by Drew Flood
Shop by Drew Flood
Restaurant by Dan Tyler
Restaurant by Dan Tyler
Small office building by Clayton Tapp
Small office building by Clayton Tapp
Apartment building by Christopher Foster
Apartment building by Christopher Foster
House by Anthony Fox
House by Anthony Fox
Office tower by Wilson Guerrero
Office tower by Wilson Guerrero

We think these models are a great start!  There’s one more artist who is not mentioned in the captions above, but whose work is there nonetheless: Jeff Quan, who made most of the cool accent models you see on top of the buildings.  These include tables, chairs, potted plants, and so on.  These are very efficient, lightweight models so we can afford to sprinkle them around liberally.

While we have loved working with all these guys, for the sake of efficiency we are going to narrow it down to just a few artists, and form a small team to do the rest of the modeling.  There’s still a lot of work to be done, in both artwork and coding, but so far everything is going smoothly.  You’re going to love the result when it’s done!

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3 thoughts on “First Buildings

  1. Tim Jones January 7, 2015 / 6:23 pm

    Depending on how real things are going to be, it seems to me that there needs to be a height limit for buildings depending on the station type, size, and spin rate. The higher the building the more pronounced the Coriolis effect can be as you change floors. Also, taller buildings would require some sort of interconnect to keep spin-induced sway from producing potential sine-wave like vibrations that could cause structural failure.

    Like

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